Pivot, Persevere And Perspective

In this episode John and Kelly talk about the concept of when you need to pivot career -wise and when you just need to persevere with persistence. They also talk about the value of perspective in making that call. In this podcast Kelly explains in her recruitment business when she had to pivot when she first started. Then there was a time when she just had to persevere and keep doing the right things consistently. John shares times in his life when he had to pivot and persevere as well. To wrap things up John and Kelly talk about perspective. John talks about how perspective changed his opinion about the recent midterm election and what’s happening politically today in the United States.

About the Hosts:

John Mitchell

John’s story is pretty amazing. After spending 20 years as an entrepreneur, John was 50 years old but wasn’t as successful as he thought he should be. To rectify that, he decided to find the “top book in the world” on SUCCESS and apply that book literally Word for Word to his life. That Book is Think & Grow Rich. The book says there’s a SECRET for success, but the author only gives you half the secret. John figured out the full secret and a 12 minute a day technique to apply it.

When John applied his 12 minute a day technique to his life, he saw his yearly income go to over $5 million a year, after 20 years of $200k – 300k per year. The 25 times increase happened because John LEVERAGED himself by applying science to his life.

His daily technique works because it focuses you ONLY on what moves the needle, triples your discipline, and consistently generates new business ideas every week. This happens because of 3 key aspects of the leveraging process.

John’s technique was profiled on the cover of Time Magazine. He teaches it at the University of Texas’ McCombs School of Business, which is one the TOP 5 business schools in the country. He is also the “mental coach” for the head athletic coaches at the University of Texas as well.

Reach out to John at john@thinkitbeit.com

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/john-mitchell-76483654/

 Kelly Hatfield

Kelly Hatfield is an entrepreneur at heart. She believes wholeheartedly in the power of the ripple effect and has built several successful companies aimed at helping others make a greater impact in their businesses and lives.

She has been in the recruiting, HR, and leadership development space for over 25 years and loves serving others. Kelly, along with her amazing business partners and teams, has built four successful businesses aimed at matching exceptional talent with top organizations and developing their leadership. Her work coaching and consulting with companies to develop their leadership teams, design recruiting and retention strategies, AND her work as host of Absolute Advantage podcast (where she talks with successful entrepreneurs, executives, and thought leaders across a variety of industries), give her a unique perspective covering the hiring experience and leadership from all angles.

As a Partner in her most recent venture, Think It Be It, Kelly has made the natural transition into the success and human achievement field, helping entrepreneurs break through to the next level in their businesses. Further expanding the impact she’s making in this world. Truly living into the power of the ripple effect.

Reach out to Kelly at kelly@thinkitbeit.com

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/kelly-hatfield-2a2610a/

Learn more about Think It Be It at https://thinkitbeit.com/

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/think-it-be-it-llc

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thinkitbeitcompany

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Transcript
Unknown:

How do driven entrepreneurs like you and me? Who want to play the game of life at our full potential? actually do that? So that we met seven figures a year and experience the overall exceptional life? It's all about leveraging our most valuable asset, our brain. But how do we train our brain to actually rewire our autopilot so that all of the right actions and focus happens automatically without thinking, as we create the exceptional life in business health, and our significant other relationships? These are the questions and this is the podcast that answers them. This is where your net seven figures a year freedom begins.

Unknown:

Welcome, I'm Kelly Hatfield. And I'm John Michell. So our topic today is pivot, perseverance and perspective. So think about this, you know, in life, there's times when we should pivot, there's times when we should just persevere. And probably at all times, we ought to have perspective. And so

Unknown:

Kelly, think about your career over the last 20 years, can you think of a time when you had to pivot and, and also a time when you had to just persevere?

Unknown:t business, which was back in:Unknown:

they didn't have anything to give us, you know, in return, I knew that if we continue to do that consistently, that as soon as things started to shift, the faucet would turn on, and we would be in good shape, which is ultimately what happened. But in the meantime, there's a three year window, where it's like, nobody's paying fees, to hire people, the market saturated with employees. So like, that was where my vision of what this company was going to be, we had to pivot

Unknown:

and begin to do contract placement. Why didn't have the kid nobody banks weren't giving out loans. You know, so I had to figure out how am I going to bank roll?

Unknown:

Payroll? uncontracted, please, because there are they would be our W two employees. So then figured out did the research figured out a company that would do that for us? You know, we're not making nearly the profit and everything but it was like, Well, who cares? It's, it's, you know, we're trying to keep things alive at this point to get this business up off the ground. So it was a total kind of pivot, you know, move that needed to be done because I did 99% of what I did, prior to starting my own business was contract work. And I was like, oh, I want to get out of that game. Right. Well, here we are back in it, you know what I mean? Because that pays the bills because that paid the bills, you know, um, so it was an it did what it needed to do in that window of time. And we just kept so this is where the persevering

Unknown:

comes in, I knew I'd been through a prior recessions through what happened in, you know, 911, I saw that if so many of our competitors, curled up into the fetal position and waited for the storm to pass, you know what I mean? And there's market share to be gained in a downturn. And I'm like, I notice. So just keep doing the right things, staying in contact building relationships. Well, that's exactly what happened. So by year three, it was like year, over year over year growth in in double and triple digits. Like, it was like, we didn't even know what to do. There was so much money, right? What we, you know what I mean, but it was, right. And, and, and that was that growth happening.

Unknown:

With the contract business you didn't like, or as you started to change? How you did it, too, we started, we had started to change how we did it, too. So it was a balance, their contract were coming in, and then the direct hire started to come back, you know, because people were doing strategic hires, and we're willing to pay fees for that. Right. So it was a, you know, we started to balance it out. Now, we're 90% of what the vision was, which is direct placement and you know, 10% contract, which, you know, again, I'm pivoting, I like, I like the profit margins on the direct hire stuff. But I'm like, we want to balance things out a little bit. So there's a little bit more consistency with cash flow and revenue. So help help our audience why what do you what do you mean when you say contract and what you mean, when you say direct hire. So direct hire is where a company hires the employee as their own w two employee and pays a fee for us to basically do the recruiting process and trying to that talent for them, okay. And then we step out of the picture, they pay us a fee to do that, right? On the contract side of things. The person remains an employee of my company, Oh, I see contracted out and working at our client company, as a as a temporary or a contract worker until either a they decide to hire them or be the contract ends, right. So companies do that when they want like a flexible workforce, or it's a special project that just requires a ramp up and people run, you know, so, yeah, so so as far as just pivoting, you know, again, that was one of those things where I had something different in mind, it almost my inability at the beginning as a as an early entrepreneur, and not seeing that having that myopic tunnel vision on what the and miss and just being so resistant to, right, almost sunk us. Like, if I hadn't have done that pivot, and been like, we just at this point, now it's survival, do what you need to do to keep the you know, to get this business up off the ground. If that hadn't happened, we wouldn't be talking today about, you know, ingenuity advantage, it wouldn't exist. Right. Right. Well, you know, that's a great example of of, you know, that combination of pivoting and perseverance. I mean, I think at any point in time, you have to, it's always a fine line. Unless things are just, you know, blowing and going. If they're not that, that is always a balance between, do I just need to double down on what I'm doing? Or do I need to pivot and go in a different direction? And there's no right or wrong answer, you just got to look at it. And I'd say, from a practical standpoint, it's good, once a quarter to sort of just, you know, step back and first week of each quarter, you know, do I need to pivot do I need to persevere?

Unknown:

And I remember back when I was in the reverse mortgage business.

Unknown:

Here's an example of pivoting. You know, I did well, this is this is for us in the reverse mortgage business when I was in my 40s. I was in the collision repair business of all businesses, because I think I could, I thought I could make it more sophisticated. And but it's a pretty blue collar business. And I grew to hate that business. Just hate it. And I'm like, there's a point where I'm like, I'm getting out of this business. If I've got to give it away, and I've got to be homeless, I am gonna give it away. I will enjoy sleeping on the streets in Dallas, Texas, as opposed to

Unknown:

sticking with this loser business. I mean, it's really a lousy business, because, you know, you can't even really mark it because the insurance companies control where people take their cars can fix so lousy business, very people oriented business nightmare. So I'm like, that one was easy. That's a pivot. And then when I got into the

Unknown:

Yeah, reverse mortgage business, it's, it's pretty much, you know, at first at first six months, it was a little bit of a struggle, but after that it was, you know, straight up. And that was just

Unknown:

perseverance. And so again, you know, you just have to

Unknown:

make that call. John, I'm interested really quick on that point about making that call. You know, for me, I know that with ingenuity advantage, I think part of the advantage I had, in deciding to persevere, to make a pivot, and then to persevere through this all was, like, I knew the recruiting business, because I'd been doing it for 14 years before, right, I knew it was a model that worked. I knew, you know, from my experience of what I'd experienced during another downturn, so I kind of carried that with me. So I had the benefit of hindsight, and experience, to help me make a decision about whether to continue to move forward with with that business or not. And I also had a passion for the work, you know, so. So for me, it was kind of an easy decision to make, you know, to do that pivot and to persevere, because of, I was so invested in it, you know, to from, like, how do you know, whether it's, it's time to put your head down and persevere, or to pivot cut, you know, cut bait? Like, what advice do you have for people listening around that? Like, how do you know, is it just an instinct? Is it like, how do you decide? Well, you know, I think you touched on it really? I think you have to look at yourself and go,

Unknown:

Well, a couple of things. Does this business play into my strengths? And is this business viable in the marketplace, and you know, like, in your case,

Unknown:

played into your your strengths, because you know, you're a people person, and in place, you've been doing the business, the business had been already been proven in the marketplace to be viable. So all that's pretty clear. And when I was in the collision repair business, I'm like, well, first of all, I'm not really a people person.

Unknown:

You know, yeah.

Unknown:

Well, that that hurts, Kelly, that that right there hurts.

Unknown:

I can't believe you'd say that. But it's John's favorite one, and John's famous, brazen, his people.

Unknown:

People come on.

Unknown:

But, you know, I finally got it through my thick head that owning a business that was people intensive, was not probably a good idea. Although, you know, seven years later, I have a county with 175 people in it.

Unknown:

But be that as it may,

Unknown:

you know, I saw that, that having people oriented businesses was not my,

Unknown:

my talent. And, and I figured out, you know, when I hit 175, in the reverse mortgage business, I figured out how to overcome that weakness by marrying this solution.

Unknown:

And Megan heard the president of the cottony

Unknown:

and let me let me do all the other stuff, but Jinju you, you'd be president in you be the people pleasing person that pulls them together? Yeah. But that was, that was a factor. And I don't know, but I again, for our audience, you got to be playing into your strengths, whatever, you got to know what they are, and play into. And, and that'll help you determine if you have to pivot or not, or whether perseverance is required.

Unknown:

And here's, here's one on on. perspective, that that's interesting. And not to get too political. But, you know, last week we have the midterms, and I'm thinking, I'm thinking boy, I hope we see the red wave. I hope we the Republicans take the the the Senate, I hope they you know, take the house, I'm all for the red wave, and then the red wave doesn't happen. And, and oh, by the way before, you know the other thing that was sort of going on, and I don't know if I told you this, but I wrote a op ed piece for The Wall Street Journal and it's on

Unknown:

lack of personal responsibility, mainly, and it's about how the progressive left and Trump both promote victimhood. Okay. And I feel strongly about a lack of personal responsibility that I see on both sides of the political spectrum. And,

Unknown:

again, not get too, too political. But this is honestly what I see. I think that Trump, although he did some good things, is a disaster for this country, because he got elected by telling people, they were victims. And then then then once he got defeated, he spreads the big lie. And you know, I see that is such a problem. Because when you have a person of influence, especially the president, telling people to ignore reality, and believe,

Unknown:

some false narrative, well, that's fundamentally a big problem. Because if if you as a person can't admit the truth in your life, and then pivot to to dealing with it, then then you're done. You're not going to have a very successful life. And so I felt very strongly about it. And I wanted to do everything I could to

Unknown:

bring the downfall of Donald Trump. And so I wrote that that article. And so that's why, at the midterms, I was like,

Unknown:

hoping for the red wave, well read, waved and come, and then I'm, like, thinking about it for a day or so. I'm like, wait a minute. This is even better than the red wave. Because clearly, the reason it didn't happen was Donald Trump and his election deniers that he got that he supported you, the only way you get his support is if you said that the election was stolen, you know, every one of them, every single one of them. Loses and, and it, it puts the nail in the coffin for Donald Trump. mark my word he is done. Now, he's evidently announcing today, he's gonna run for president, but he is done. Watch how it plays out. And and I'm like, Wow, what a matter of perspective, you know, to what, two days ago, I thought this and wanted that. And now I'm like, Oh, this is even better than what I thought. Because, you know, it's basically you know, that the house, stay goes Republican, and you crash and burn Trump, and hey, all good, better than I thought. But But and I know, you have probably a story about perspective as well, right? Well, yeah, no, I do it happened just last week. But before I do that, I want to just point something out from a perspective standpoint. And, you know, you and I have different perspectives, you know, so I was not hoping for, right,

Unknown:

that was actually my nightmare.

Unknown:

You know, my nightmare scenario. So I think, you know, what I love, you know, about John and I are that here we are, we're obviously different, you know, genders, different generations, you know, different political views. And yet you can, you can have the same values, the same beliefs the same and have productive and engaging conversations and different perspectives, that you each bring into the conversation that enrich it, they enrich the conversation, the topic, the you know, so I love that about us, and the fact that you that, that I just wish more people, you know, and we think alike in so many ways, you know, that there are some things that are different about us. And I think I wish that more

Unknown:

people would listen to one another and sit down and have meaningful conversations and try to understand other people's perspectives. And I think if we did that, you know, we wouldn't see each division and everything that we're seeing right now. Well, you know, I see you with my some of my liberal friends. And again, I'm probably liberal, socially and fiscally conservative. And I wouldn't claim to be a Republican today. But I see that anytime I talk to my liberal friends, we can always have a civil discussion. And if you said you to have to figure out the solution. We could, it wouldn't be that hard. And you know, that's why we have to get rid of people like Trump that, that promote division and promote hatred. And you know, in the article I wrote, I talked to

Unknown:

about how he is a classic case of a, what's the word of a clinical narcissist? Yeah. And you know, when you study what that is, she was like four or five things, you know, you're, you're you're paranoid, you're, you're thinking that people are out to get you. And you're, you're looking at, you know, spreading hatred, and, you know, he just has all the, all the characteristics and more than anything over the next couple of years, we need to get out of this mess that we've been in, and and we will, will, will, will get to a better place. Absolutely. So and I think it's that one thing. And John just goes back to your question about perspective. So I had a recertification for high performance coaching that I do, that I went through last week. And, you know, it's a group of about 135 People from all over the world, right, you know, who weren't being trained on the same thing. And you're hearing all of these stories, you know, these are wonderful people, again, all different types of world genders, beliefs, values, and everything, but we're coming together, you know, to learn to grow. And one thing that just stood out to me was, we're all so much more alike than we are like, you know, we all had the same intention, which was to learn, grow, show up as the best version of ourselves. And yet, we all couldn't be more different than one another, you know what I mean? Right, right. Just seeing those different perspectives, and what some of these folk stories were, and, you know, again, it really just gives you the, you know, I, I left last week, just with a overwhelming sense of gratitude, you know, to

Unknown:

for the opportunity, you know, for, you know, we talked about this, we were just found the topics of political politics, but I'm so grateful that I was born as a woman in the country that I'm in. I mean, you see what's happening in different parts of the country at the time that I was born in, you know, and I'm just so grateful for that. Yes, we have some things we need to fight for, and we need to but like, overall, like I was talking with this gal from Lebanon, who's all of her money has been frozen. The government has frozen their money. And I'm like, I mean, I don't even understand I can't wrap my head around that, you know what I mean? And so anyway, again, just perspectives and, and it was a wonderful experience last week, so Right, yeah. All right. Well, that's good. Okay. Well, until next time, we'll see you.