DEEP THINKING – Two Times A Week

troytibi

In this episode John and Kelly discuss the importance of setting aside time to think two times a week. But this isn’t regular thinking. This is DEEP THINKING. Each thinking session is about 30 minutes long. First five minutes is just writing in your thinking tablet whatever comes to you. Then for the remaining 25 minutes approximately, figure out a question that you need the answer to. By virtue of asking yourself the question, you automatically trigger yourself into a deeper form of thinking. This is where the gold is. Then after you have written down the last thing you thought about, you draw a line. Then list the two or three takeaways and also the action steps. So that’s how it works. Kelly talks about how transformative this has been in her business. It generated the wildly successful book club she incorporated. With John, he talks about how this deep thinking technique made him $6 million on one idea. John also offers a valuable tip on how to get into the alpha state, where people are most creative. To wrap up the episode, we hear from a friend of John’s, Keith Cunningham, who wrote the book “The Road Less Stupid”. He works with Tony Robbins and he expands on this idea of asking yourself a question.

About the Hosts:

John Mitchell

John’s story is pretty amazing. After spending 20 years as an entrepreneur, John was 50 years old but wasn’t as successful as he thought he should be. To rectify that, he decided to find the “top book in the world” on SUCCESS and apply that book literally Word for Word to his life. That Book is Think & Grow Rich. The book says there’s a SECRET for success, but the author only gives you half the secret. John figured out the full secret and a 12 minute a day technique to apply it.

When John applied his 12 minute a day technique to his life, he saw his yearly income go to over $5 million a year, after 20 years of $200k – 300k per year. The 25 times increase happened because John LEVERAGED himself by applying science to his life.

His daily technique works because it focuses you ONLY on what moves the needle, triples your discipline, and consistently generates new business ideas every week. This happens because of 3 key aspects of the leveraging process.

John’s technique was profiled on the cover of Time Magazine. He teaches it at the University of Texas’ McCombs School of Business, which is one the TOP 5 business schools in the country. He is also the “mental coach” for the head athletic coaches at the University of Texas as well.

Reach out to John at john@thinkitbeit.com

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/john-mitchell-76483654/

 

Kelly Hatfield

Kelly Hatfield is an entrepreneur at heart. She believes wholeheartedly in the power of the ripple effect and has built several successful companies aimed at helping others make a greater impact in their businesses and lives.

She has been in the recruiting, HR, and leadership development space for over 25 years and loves serving others. Kelly, along with her amazing business partners and teams, has built four successful businesses aimed at matching exceptional talent with top organizations and developing their leadership. Her work coaching and consulting with companies to develop their leadership teams, design recruiting and retention strategies, AND her work as host of Absolute Advantage podcast (where she talks with successful entrepreneurs, executives, and thought leaders across a variety of industries), give her a unique perspective covering the hiring experience and leadership from all angles.

As a Partner in her most recent venture, Think It Be It, Kelly has made the natural transition into the success and human achievement field, helping entrepreneurs break through to the next level in their businesses. Further expanding the impact she’s making in this world. Truly living into the power of the ripple effect.

Reach out to Kelly at kelly@thinkitbeit.com

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/kelly-hatfield-2a2610a/

Learn more about Think It Be It at https://thinkitbeit.com/

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/think-it-be-it-llc

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thinkitbeitcompany

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it using the social media buttons on this page.

Do you have some feedback or questions about this episode? Leave a comment in the section below!

Subscribe to the podcast

If you would like to get automatic updates of new podcast episodes, you can subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher. You can also subscribe in your favorite podcast app.

Leave us an Apple Podcasts review

Ratings and reviews from our listeners are extremely valuable to us and greatly appreciated. They help our podcast rank higher on Apple Podcasts, which exposes our show to more awesome listeners like you. If you have a minute, please leave an honest review on Apple Podcasts.

Transcript
Kelly Hatfield:

How do driven entrepreneurs like you and me? Who want to play the game of life at our full potential? actually do that? So that we met seven figures a year and experience the overall exceptional life? It's all about leveraging our most valuable asset, our brain. But how do we train our brain to actually rewire our autopilot so that all of the right actions and focus happens automatically without thinking, as we create the exceptional life in business health, and our significant other relationships? These are the questions and this is the podcast that answers them. This is where your net seven figures a year freedom begins.

Kelly Hatfield:

Welcome, I'm Kelly

John Mitchell:

Hatfield. Hey. And I'm John Mitchell.

Kelly Hatfield:

And today we are going to talk about this this idea of think, of deep thinking time, this technique that John has developed. And it's based on so many of the what the best and brightest thinkers and most innovative thinkers use a similar type of technique. And so we're gonna visit a little bit about that. But I would encourage you to listen to our last podcast episode where, you know, we talked about growth. And we referenced this technique in that last episode on how to really leverage that growth. So might be good to listen to that episode. You know, after you listen to this one, or, but they're great in tandem, so just wanted to kind of give you the heads up that, to listen to that if you haven't listened to it already. So John, why don't we dive in and talk about this idea of setting aside time to think deeply, too tight at least two times a week?

John Mitchell:

You know, I think, you know, early in our podcast, we probably did an episode on this. But it's so important. We want to give you more of a maybe an insight into this. And you know, one thing that hits me is that today we live in such a we think very shallow Lee because and I think that happens naturally, because we have so much coming at us that by our nature where we're thinking shallow, well, that's a big problem. Because if you're always thinking shallow, you're not going to see the solutions to big issues. And so this technique is setting aside time to think two times a week to deep thing has been so transformative in in my life. And just to recap how it works, we again, we covered it in a prior episode. But basically, you're setting aside about 30 minutes, two times a week in the morning, and you pick the morning to work for you, I do Wednesday and Sundays. But then the then is a three step process. First five minutes, let whatever comes to you come to you, and just write it down, just sort of freeform thinking. Then the second part and the more important part is to figure out a question to ask yourself that you need the answer to like Einstein said, if he had an hour to solve a problem, he'd spend 55 minutes thinking about what the right question to ask is, and so you got to you know, figure out what the right question to ask and the rest of the 30 minutes you're going to, you're going to spend answering that question. And then the third step after you answer the question is draw a line into the last thing you wrote in your thinking tablet, and list the two or three takeaways, and the two or three action steps so so and then you put the action steps on next week's to do so you're connecting your your thinking to your your action. So that's that's sort of how it how it works. Anything else you want to add to that?

Kelly Hatfield:

No, I think you know, and you mentioned was pretty brilliant

John Mitchell:

one

Kelly Hatfield:

that was it was pretty dang good until you want to say to everybody is a little different. And you pick those days and in the mornings because that's the days that makes sense to you. And the mornings are when your brain is firing on all cylinders and where your your sharpest. And you know before your day gets hectic and you know, busy versus somebody else, it might be you know, a way that they decompress after a day of input and just processing you know, their day I utilize it in a couple of different ways. So this is all about testing and determining what works for you. The key thing is that you're actually setting aside time that it's going on your calendar, just like anything else would so that you don't let a you know something come up and throw you off track and not do it because this is critical time. You know that will supercharge your business in any area of your life, what the quality of your questions determines the quality of your life. You You know, and so when this time is critical to think deeply, and so I just wanted wanted to mention, John, you mentioned what works for you. I think this too, is about experimenting, that's a great place to start, but then experimenting and really identifying what works for yourself, because the key is that you do it. So no, that's,

John Mitchell:

that's a good point. So you, you alluded to you do it a couple of ways. So how do you do it?

Kelly Hatfield:

Yeah, so one of the ways I do it, so I've got a day a week that I do do it in the morning, when I'm clear. And you know, I have a place that I go to, depending on the time of year, I like to do it outside. But if that isn't possible, because I live in Washington State, you know, then I've got another place in my home that I love, I don't do it at my workstation, I don't do it, I want it to have a different energy. And so and then I do it at least one time a week, I do it in the evenings. And it's really as a kind of download. For me, it's a, you know, we mentioned this in our last one, we were talking about growth. So I may have listened to a podcast that morning, and an idea might have sparked, and I'm like, Oh, I'm gonna vet that idea out. In my thinking time, you know, I want to think about that a little bit more deeply. And determine whether that's something that might make sense in our organization, or how we might be able to utilize it or apply it, you know, so I'll use the time to think more deeply about some of the growth and the learning I'm doing. I'll use it to guide Why do I feel the way I do? Like, I'm really stressed today, why do I feel that way? And then I'll start, you know, jotting that down a little bit and be like, okay, you know, once you get it out onto paper, it's like, well, there's not really a whole lot here to be stressed about this is me, you know, needing to manage my emotions a little bit better and worse solutions to that. So for me, it really is a download, I'll use it as a review of the day, you know, like, hey, what were some of today's wins? And why did that go? Well, and then if things if something didn't go, Well, I'm analyzing how could we have gotten a different outcome than we did? You know, so I utilize it a couple of different ways. One is really for innovation. And I usually do that in the mornings, again, when my mind is clear. And then the other is for, you know, just analysis.

John Mitchell:

Hmm. You know, you you said something that I think is really powerful about how, you know, you may listen to a podcast a day or two previous. And now that becomes the subject of thinking, you know, that's that, in a nutshell, is just proactively influencing your subconscious mind, which, which, again, is what we're all about, and the top book the world on successes is all about. And so, you know, having a set time two times a week to think is is really the output venue for all the input that's coming in. And it's this, this loop that I think is so powerful that you get all this input coming in from doing things here and things, learning things, and you need an output for it. But and when you have that output, it really does create a powerful loop.

Kelly Hatfield:

Right. Yeah, absolutely. And let me just give a little bit of an example of this. So I'll go back to I alluded to this a little bit in the last episode, where the question, one of the questions that I asked myself was, okay, so one of our key values as an organization is a growth mindset. So the question was, are we really embracing that within our organization? You know, yes, no, if not, what are some additional ways that we could do that? So because I'm tuned into this, and I know, I have this thinking time scheduled, this idea that came up in a podcast that was like, Oh, that'd be interesting, was around the idea of implementing a book club in your company? You know, so it's paid for that. It's done over lunch? You know, we vote on the book. And it's a, a, there's an assignment each week with a monthly discussion around it. We have contests to each week within Facebook, but we didn't at that time, it was, you know, it was just this idea. You know, so then it was thinking about it more deeply as this align, you know, you're just again, asking yourself more questions like, okay, so if we were to look at implementing this, what would the first step be? You know, and then it would be one to reach out to that podcast host, or the podcast guest who specializes in creating book clubs within companies and pick their brain a little bit, you know, and then it started this whole cascade, and then of course, I delegated it off to people within the organization, because that's part of what this thinking exercise is, you know, and I mean, engagement is through the roof. It's one of their favorite things. Whenever we do our performance reviews, that's one of the top things on the list that they love about working for the company is the book club. But you know, productivity isn't an increase the cohesion of the team with very little time and over I mean, all of this, I think is associated. And I heard that idea, you know, but had I not been doing this deep thinking time and asked myself the question around our company values, and been digging in a little bit than this, because my reticular activating system was focused on, it pulled in the input from the podcast, from the podcast about the book club. So I just want to tie it and give a real example to people and what we mean, when we're talking about this. I don't know how much that one idea has brought to our bottom line, because what price do you put on not having turnover within your organization having to, like, you know, increased productivity, increased engagement, and a place where people love to come to work. So it's easy to recruit and hire for your company. Like, there's all kinds of benefits that have come from this one idea. And had I not been doing this, this deep thinking, I don't think I would have ever made the connection between those two, because like you said earlier, John, we're running 100 miles an hour, we're getting all of this input, you know, all day long, and it would have been just kind of bouncing around in my head. But until there was a space for me to have, you know, a time and a space saved for me to do this kind of thinking, was I able to bring that to life? Does that right?

John Mitchell:

Yeah. Yeah, you know, I think back on all this stuff, this is brought to me and and sometimes I'm like, you know, have I ever had an original idea of my own saying, like, I'm always taking an idea that I've heard, you know, is like, we just interviewed Christo Conte, the athletic director at the University of Texas, and he's not shy about talking about how he, he calls it r&d rip off and duplicate. Which is funny, but I think back on on, over the years, I remember when I was in the reverse mortgage business, one of my thinking sessions came down to thinking about realizing that every reverse mortgages needed a title company, and that spawned the idea via create my own title company. And that one idea made me $6 million. So you know, pretty good idea. And, you know, it's, it's interesting, just, just recently, in the last month, I saw a way for us to bring think it be it to millions of people. And I I've just been, you know, it's it's so energizing. And this, this came from a thinking session, and it interests me so much the process that and this happened probably a month ago, three weeks ago, last week, I went back and I'm like, I'm gonna go look at my thinking tablet, and see, how did that idea germinate? You know, and I could, I could identify that it actually happened on the 22nd of August, because I hit I go, I went back and looked at my thinking before that date, and I didn't see it. And then I saw it that day, and boom, and, and I also can see why the idea came to me. And so it's just fascinating how, how powerful this is.

Kelly Hatfield:

Absolutely. So, you know, again, the highlights would be, make sure to schedule this time, because that's the, that's the key, you know, it's like anything else, it doesn't work, if you don't do it. No kids, don't get it on your calendar and make an appointment and a commitment to yourself to set this time aside to bake. You know, and, and initially, if you're you know, if it's a challenge, utilize it as that down as that as that download of the of the input that you're getting from your personal growth, and thinking about that, thinking about those topics a little bit more deeply, just to kind of start to get into the habit and break the seal a little bit, you know, and you'll just get better and better at it, the more and more you do it. So.

John Mitchell:

And you know, the other thing that you said, I think that that's good as we sort of wrap this up is you got to customize it to you. Like we had a client that sort of struggled with this when we first taught it to him. And I ultimately said Listen, do your thinking time in the shower, you know, and then as you get out of the shower, grab your thinking tablet and and and that worked for him. And one other little tweak to this, and I started doing this, you know, and this is little science. We are all most creative when we're in the Alpha state. And the alpha state as we are operating on a on a daily basis. We're not in alpha, we're actually in beta. These are this is the length of the brainwaves. So when you're awake, you're basically in and beta and when you're dreaming. You'll go into an You're asleep, you'll go into alpha, but you have flashes of alpha, even when you're awake. And that's why sometimes ideas appear as a flash. It said, that alpha moment, and but I found an incredibly effective way to get to Alpha Heasley. And I do this every Wednesday mornings. Usually, I, when I wake up, you know, one of the first things I go do is I go the bathroom, and I'm still like, groggy, but and I'll get back in bed, and I can get right back into alpha with no effort. But instead of just sort of letting, letting it go wherever it wants to go, I go, I try and control it by by what's my question today? Or what's, what do I need to know that the universities to tell me and, and having that sort of heightened awareness, even though I'm in in a dream state, and you know, this has produced some really interesting ideas, so something to consider. And to wrap this up? Finally, I'm going to share with you a clip from my friend, Keith Cunningham, who is a pretty cool guy, he works with Tony Robbins. Kelly, he did the book, but was it ever

Kelly Hatfield:

I think the road less stupid? Yeah, let's do

John Mitchell:

it. Boy, boy, I know I've gone down those stupid roads. I'm interested in the less stupid, but he's, he's pretty cool. And he has a really cool twist on this. And he's a good friend of mine. So we're going to play it now.

Unknown:

You have a whole process in the book to think through. I mean, there's so much, but thinking time, and I want to talk about thinking time, and how do you describe that process? Why is it so important, and it slows people down, so that they can go faster, and so that they can not build a machine for the problem that isn't right. And there's so much knowledge and skills, especially in this room, I mean, everyone here has had a certain level of accomplishment because they wouldn't even be in this room if they hadn't. And at the same time, taking this knowledge and wisdom that's within them and being able to flesh it out by simply asking themselves the right questions and giving themselves in the time to come to that is your thinking time process. So I'd love to have you describe that.

Unknown:ns on those themes out of the:Unknown:

I turn off my machines, I'm not in front of a computer, I have a kitchen clock timer that I set for 45 minutes, so I'm not constantly picking up my phone or glancing at the clocks in my office. And, and, and I got a chair that I sit in. And the only time I sit in this chair is when I'm gonna think I got a big chief tablet. And I got a pin. And the only time I touch this pin, sit in this chair with this tablet is when I went back to think I've pre framed my thinking time with a question that I've developed that I need to ask myself that would I'm going to think about and the idea of thinking time is not to come up with the right answer. This idea of thinking time is to come up with a lot of answers. You know how to have a great idea? Do you not have a great idea? Have a lot of them and pick the best one? That's exactly what we want to do. We want to have a lot of ideas. And the thinking time process is all about can I generate more ideas, more possibilities, more choices than what I have today. So here's, here's a discipline. That's what thinking time is. It's a discipline that says if if I can sit quietly if business is an intellectual sport, which it is, in my opinion. And if I'm going to be successful in solving problems, or taking advantage of opportunities, or identifying risk are figuring out what the obstacle is, as opposed to the symptom. If I'm going to be successful in that, I need to stop reacting, I need to stop launching. And what I need to start doing is thinking about here's possibilities. And when I'm done with thinking time the alarm goes off when I think it looks like this. So I've got I'm in my chair, I get all settled, then I gotta get my body really really still. Which which my body is going to interfere with my thinking. So I always clear my throat I take a sip of water I do whatever I need to do suits my but I get very, very still I get my question or questions on my piece of paper. I start my timer and I literally am my hand over my eyes. Not only looking down, if I look up, I get distracted. And I go into 45 minutes and then the buzzer goes off and then I look and say okay, well which one of these answers or which ones do I need to think more about? I've yet to have a thinking time and 28 years of yet thinking time that didn't add massive value. Has anybody in here taken no single you've taken four day MBA you've heard me say this. Take away all my skills take away all my money. Leave me only thinking time. I'll get it back. That's how powerful this tool is.